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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

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At Royal Cornwall Museum we are constantly adding images to our collection, so you will always find something new to look at.

We have a large collection of images and would like to keep you up to date with our new additions and promotional offers that we may run from time to time. We will not send you hundreds of emails, no more than one every few months.


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Choose a picture from our collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Pednandrea stamps and mine dressing floor at Wheal Sparnon, Redruth, Cornwall. 1865 Featured Print

Pednandrea stamps and mine dressing floor at Wheal Sparnon, Redruth, Cornwall. 1865

The area in the photograph is now covered by Clinton Road, Park Road and Albany Road, Redruth. According to the Ordnance Survey Six Inch map Cornwall LXIII. NE, surveyed 1877 to 1879, the mine is disused at that time. By the same OS area map Cornwall LXIII. NE Revised 1906, the whole are is covered in housing. The mine produced copper, as well as traces of cobalt and gold. Thomas Spargo states in his book, The Mines of Cornwall (1865), that "Wheal Sparnon was in the the parish of Redruth, Cornwall, in 6,000 shares. Secretary, Mr G.H. Cardozo, London. Purser, Mr W.P. Cardozo, Camborne. Manager, Captain Wm. Tregay, Redruth. Rocks, granite and clay-slate, 60 men employed in the mine, operations on the surface of which commenced in 1864. Land owner, Lord Clinton. Dues 1-20th. Depth of adit, 18 fathoms; depth under adit, 60 fathoms. A 70-inch pumping-engine just completed, also a 22-inch winding-engine. Little has been as yet been done by the Company under the surface; but it is generally believed that enormous quantities of tin will be raised after the mine has been cleared of water". Photographer: Probably Henry Opie.

© From the collection of the RIC

Joseph Tangye (1826-1902) on a velocipede, probably Wolverhampton, West Midlands. Around 1870 Featured Print

Joseph Tangye (1826-1902) on a velocipede, probably Wolverhampton, West Midlands. Around 1870

The velocipede in the photograph is very similar to the one in the collection of the Royal Cornwall Museum (TRURI : 1937.34). Tangye's Cornwall Works in Birmingham built large numbers of velocipedes, paying a royalty to the French Velocipede Company in order to make the bicycles. The five sons of Joseph Tangye senior, an Illogan miner, commenced their engineering and manufacturing business together in Birmingham in 1856. James (1825-1912), the eldest, was very skilled with the lathe; Joseph (1826-1902) was the creative engineer; Richard (1833-1906) dealt with public relations and sales; George (1835-1920) was the businessman; while Edward (1832-1909), a Quaker, soon left to found his own business. Velocipedes, also known as 'Boneshakers', due to their iron 'tyres', were one of the many things that were manufactured at the Cornwall Works. The business also provided the hydraulic rams required to launch the Great Eastern, Brunel's ill-fated steel ship in 1857-1858, and to raise Cleopatra's Needle to its present position on the London Embankment in 1878. The first direct-acting steam pumps in Europe were made at the Cornwall Works in 1867 and the firm produced James Tangye's horizontal steam engines from 1869. By 1876 the firm employed 1300 workers. The Tangyes were also philanthropists and from 1880 were founders and major benefactors of the Birmingham Art Gallery and Museum and the Birmingham School of Art. Photographer: Edward Hill, 39, Darlington Street, Wolverhampton.

© From the collection of the RIC

The Victualling Office, Plymouth, Devon, from Mount Edgcumbe, Maker, Cornwall. 23rd September 1845 Featured Print

The Victualling Office, Plymouth, Devon, from Mount Edgcumbe, Maker, Cornwall. 23rd September 1845

Fox Talbot 'sun picture' or Talbotype view from Mount Edgcumbe looking over to the Royal William Yard, Plymouth, Devon. The image shows a gentleman looking through a telescope and three ladies standing beside some cannon. The gentleman in the picture is possible Captain Corry and members of the Edgcumbe family. William Henry Fox Talbot's sister, Lady Caroline Augusta was married to the Earl of Mount Edgcumbe and he was staying there when the photograph was taken on 23rd September 1845. This is one of the earliest photographs taken in Cornwall and is the first photograph to be used as an illustration in a periodical. It is contained in 'The Art Journal,' Volume 8, 1846, to illustrate a description of Fox Talbot's process of using sunlight on sensitised paper to create multiple copies of an image and it was a start of photo-journalism. Photographer: William Henry Fox Talbot.

© From the collection of the RIC