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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Buildings Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 153 pictures in our Buildings collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Ince Castle, Elm Gate, St Stephens by Saltash, Cornwall. 1961 Featured Print

Ince Castle, Elm Gate, St Stephens by Saltash, Cornwall. 1961

The main facade of Ince Castle, seen under scaffolding, during alteration work which included the addition of French windows to allow more light to the dark ground floor and extension of the service wing. The Grade I listed mansion house is thought to be the earliest brick house in Cornwall and overlooks the River Lynher, near Saltash. It was built by Henry Killigrew, Member of Parliament for West Looe, in the mid 17th century. The house was then bought by Truro merchant Edward Norsworthy in 1652. In 1722 the house was owned by John Hobart, 1st Earl of Buckinghamshire, before being sold to Pendock Neale, husband of Harriot Eliot of St Germans. In 1805, Ince was sold to Edward Smith. The house was inherited by his stepdaughter, Mary Smith, who lived there with her husband, Captain Henry Crease of the Royal Navy, and family until the 1850s. The house became rundown until it was bought and substantially remodelled by Montague Eliot (later to become 8th Earl of St Germans) in 1918. Between 1922 and 1937, Ince was owned by H.R. Somerset (known as Bobby), a well known yachtsman and founder member of the Royal Ocean Racing Club. His yacht, Jolie Brise, was the first winner of the Fastnet Race and was housed in the boathouse at Ince. Mr and Mrs James Bryce Allen owned the house between 1937 and 1960 when it was sold to Patricia, Viscountess Boyd, who was married to former Colonial Secretary Alan Lennox-Boyd, 1st Viscount Boyd of Merton. The gardens were created in the 1960s by Patricia, Lady Boyd, a keen plantswoman and vice-president of Cornwall Garden Society. Their son, Simon Lennox-Boyd, 2nd Viscount Boyd of Merton, and daughter in law, Alice, Lady Boyd, lived in the house between 1994 and 2018. Photographer: Charles Woolf

© RIC, photographer Charles Woolf

Richard Arthur (Dicky Nine Lives), Edwyn Vincent (1858–1919) Featured Print

Richard Arthur (Dicky Nine Lives), Edwyn Vincent (1858–1919)

Oil on canvas, English School, 1887. Primitive style full length portrait of man in mining clothes with Pednandrea Mine in the background of the painting. Richard Arthur was known as Dicky Nine Lives, after falling down the inside of Pednandrea mine stack and surviving. He died in Penzance in June 1893, at the age of around 70. A report from Redruth in the Royal Cornwall Gazette on Thursday 15th June 1893 states: News has reached here from Penzance of the death of the well known character, Richard Arthur, generally known as "Dickey Nine Lives" by reason of numerous hairbreadth escapes, chief among which was a fall down the inside of Pednandrea stack. This wonderful man was well known to almost every person within a radius of 15 miles, and his marvellous exploits have formed the topic of many a Cornish yarn. With no settled residence or means of sustenance, he managed to exist with the occasional comfort of a "bit of bacca." When sometime ago it was rumoured that Dicky had suddenly inherited a large fortune, he was immediately addressed as Mr. Arthur, and for some reason consented to have his "picture taken" by a local photographer. This photo when exhibited caused considerable amusement, Dickey being taken in his usual attire. The fortune eventually turned out to be a hoax. It would hardly be possible to find in Cornwall a person whose life has to abounded in comical incidents, and a sharp literary aspirant would win immediate popularity by publishing a life of Dickey Nine Lives. Edwyn Vincent was publisher and printer of The Eagle at the Printing Works Redruth. This painting may have been intended to illustrate an article in The Eagle

© RIC

Aftermath of fire at Tehidy, Illogan, Cornwall. February 1919 Featured Print

Aftermath of fire at Tehidy, Illogan, Cornwall. February 1919

Side view of the house after the great fire of 26th February 1919. The fire is still smouldering and firefighters with the Redruth fire engine can be seen tackling the blaze, watched by many onlookers. The manor of Tehidy was owned by the Basset family who prospered from mining and their vast estate. The 40 bedroom mansion house seen in the photograph was built in 1855 to replace the earlier mansion of 1734. The manor was sold in 1916 ending 700 years of Basset rule. The house was acquired for the treatment of tuberculosis sufferers and handed over to Cornwall County Council on Whit Monday 20th May 1918. The fire devastated the building two weeks after the hospital opened and it was rebuilt by the County Council. Photographer: Arthur William Jordan

© From the collection of the RIC