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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Cottage Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 30 pictures in our Cottage collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


House in the Trees at Hampstead, John Constable (1776-1837) Featured Print

House in the Trees at Hampstead, John Constable (1776-1837)

Oil on board, English School, 1821. John Constable was the son of wealthy miller in Bergholt, Suffolk. His family did not approve of his vocation as an artist but he joined the Royal Academy Schools as a student in 1799. From 1802 until around 1820 his paintings mostly featured the landscape of Suffolk, a number of which were made by sketching in oils, which had been popular among young English landscape artists since before 1800. Constable took this quick and direct method of painting and developed it into a tool of great range and refinement. The most famous example of work from this Suffolk-based phase is The Hay Wain (1821), which was in fact painted in the studio. Constable was elected to the Royal Academy in 1819 and from then onwards based himself in London and Hampstead. In 1829 he was made a full Academician and the last years of his life were spent consolidating his reputation as one of Britain's foremost landscape painters. House in the Trees at Hampstead is a study of trees made against the sky and it is one of several that the artist made shortly after he settled permanently in Hampstead with his family. It is unclear whether these sketches resulted in a finished work or whether he employed the tree and cloud studies in these sketches for a painting somewhere else.

© RIC

View of Goonvrea House with Cliff House below, Perranarworthal, Cornwall. December 1924 Featured Print

View of Goonvrea House with Cliff House below, Perranarworthal, Cornwall. December 1924

The general view from across the valley to Goonvrea House with it's gardens behind and the coach house and stables to the right. In 1980, Rex Barratt writes in his book, Stately Homes in and Around Truro, "Goonvrea, probably built by the Fox family of Falmouth and later owned and occupied by Sir Frederick Martin Williams, M.P. for Truro (1865-1878), who was a director of the Perran Iron Foundry and the first Provincial Grand Master of Mark Masons of Cornwall. Later owners were J.P. Paull, and W.E. Harris, who was there in 1939. During the last war it was utilised by U.S. troops and is now a well-known hotel". The hotel was owned by Tony and Joyce Webb and is reported to have been devastated by fire in 1982. By the early 1990s new build houses were erected on the site. The stable block remained standing and has since been converted into houses. Photographer: Arthur William Jordan.

© From the collection of the RIC