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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

Harbour Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 48 pictures in our Harbour collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Print

Henry Scott Tuke's French brigantine 'Julie of Nantes' at the Mill Dam, Falmouth, Cornwall. Around 1886

The artist, Henry Scott Tuke (1858-1929), purchased Julie of Nantes in 1886 for use as a floating studio. It is thought that he can be seen standing at the bow of the ship. Henry Scott Tuke was born into a Quaker family in Lawrence Street, York. In 1859 the family moved to Falmouth, where his father Daniel Tuke, a physician, established a practice. Tuke was encouraged to draw and paint from an early age and some of his earliest drawings, aged four or five years old, were published in 1895. In 1875, he enrolled in the Slade School of Art. Initially his father paid for his tuition but in 1877 Tuke won a scholarship, which allowed him to continue his training at the Slade and in Italy in 1880. From 1881 to 1883 he was in Paris where he met the artist Jules Bastien-Lepage, who encouraged him to paint en plein air (in the open air) a method of working that came to dominate his practice. While studying in France, Tuke decided to move to Newlyn Cornwall where many of his Slade and Parisian friends had already formed the Newlyn School of painters. He received several lucrative commissions there, after exhibiting his work at the Royal Academy of Art in London. In 1885, he returned to Falmouth where many of his major works were produced. He became an established artist and was elected to full membership of the Royal Academy in 1914. Tuke suffered a heart attack in 1928 and died in March 1929. In his will he left generous amounts of money to some of the men who, as boys, had been his models. Today he is remembered mainly for his oil paintings of young men, but in addition to his achievements as a figurative painter, he was an established maritime artist and produced as many portraits of sailing ships as he did human figures. He was a prolific artist, over 1,300 works are listed and more are still being discovered. Photographer: Unknown.

© From the collection of the RIC

Featured Print

Ships in a Harbour, Eugene Boudin (1824-1898)

Oil on panel, French School, 19th century. Eugene Louis Boudin was one of the first French landscape painters to paint outdoors. Boudin was a marine painter, and expert in the rendering of all that goes upon the sea and along its shores. Corot called him the 'king of the skies'. He first exhibited at the Paris Salon in 1853 and late in his career began to receive prizes and accolades for his work. In 1857/1858 Boudin befriended the young Claude Monet, then only 18, and persuaded him to give up his teenage caricature drawings and to become a landscape painter. He helped to instil in him a love of colour and light and of how these can be enhanced by their reflection in water. The two remained lifelong friends and Monet later paid tribute to Boudin's early influence. Boudin joined Monet and his young friends in the first Impressionist exhibition in 1873, but never considered himself a radical or innovator. Boudin was made a member of the Legion d'Honneur in 1892.

© © RIC

Featured Print

RNLI lifeboat Arab II at Harlyn Bay, St Merryn, Cornwall. Around 1908

The RNLI Lifeboat Arab II being towed across the sands at Harlyn Bay to be launched, followed by a mixed group of men, women and children. There are ten paired horses pulling the vessel, which is being transported on a substantially built cart whose steel wheel tyres are of a broad width. The Arab II was built in 1901 to replace the Arab I which was wrecked on 11th April 1900. She was in service from 1901-1931. Her first service was 1st March 1903 to aid the steam trawler Birda. Photographer: Unknown.

© From the collection of the RIC