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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

Men Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 125 pictures in our Men collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Print

Knill Monument, St Ives, Cornwall. 1901 or 1906

Panoramic view of crowds at the "Knill Ceremony" overlooking Carbis Bay, St Ives, probably 1901 or 1906. John Knill was born in Callington on 1st January 1733 and worked as a collector of Customs in St Ives between 1762 and 1782, where he also became mayor in 1767. He was regarded as being slightly eccentric. In that same year, 1767, he decided to build a 50 foot, three sided, pyramid style granite structure on Worvas Hill just to the south of St Ives, to be known as Knill's Steeple. It was erected as his intended burial place. The monument bears on one side the painted coat of arms of Knill, with the Latin "Resurgam" (I shall arise) and, in English, "I know that my redeemer liveth". In his will he left detailed instructions for ceremonies to be carried out in his memory every five years on St James Day, July 25th at the Steeple, including dancing for fifteen minutes to the tune of "All people that on earth due dwell" by ten young girls under the age of 10, and who traditionally have to be daughters of either fishermen, tinners or seamen. They are accompanied by two widows, the Mayor, the Customs Officer and a Master of Ceremonies. In his will John left money for the upkeep of the monument and for celebrations to take place. The first ceremony, in which John Knill participated, took place in 1801. He died in his chambers on 29th July 1811 in Gray's Inn Square London and is buried in St Andrew's Church, Holborn. Photographer: Probably Edward Ashton.

© From the collection of the RIC

Featured Print

The Boy Jacka, Henry Scott Tuke (1858-1929)

Oil on canvas, Newlyn School, 1886-1888. Full length portrait of boy against a green door. Henry Scott Tuke was born into a Quaker family in Lawrence Street, York. In 1859 the family moved to Falmouth, where his father Daniel Tuke , a physician, established a practice. Tuke was encouraged to draw and paint from an early age and some of his earliest drawings, aged four or five years old, were published in 1895. In 1875, he enrolled in the Slade School of Art. Initially his father paid for his tuition but in 1877 Tuke won a scholarship, which allowed him to continue his training at the Slade and in Italy in 1880. From 1881 to 1883 he was in Paris where he met the artist Jules Bastien-Lepage, who encouraged him to paint en plein air (in the open air) a method of working that came to dominate his practice. While studying in France, Tuke decided to move to Newlyn, Cornwall where many of his Slade and Parisian friends had already formed the Newlyn School of painters. He received several lucrative commissions there, after exhibiting his work at the Royal Academy of Art in London. In 1885, he returned to Falmouth where many of his major works were produced. He became an established artist and was elected to full membership of the Royal Academy in 1914. Tuke suffered a heart attack in 1928 and died in March 1929. In his will he left generous amounts of money to some of the men who, as boys, had been his models. Today he is remembered mainly for his oil paintings of young men, but in addition to his achievements as a figurative painter, he was an established maritime artist and produced as many portraits of sailing ships as he did human figures. He was a prolific artist, over 1,300 works are listed and more are still being discovered. Tuke painted over 13 portraits of 'quay scamp' and deckhand Jack 'Jacka' Rowing (Rolling) between 1886 and 1888. Rowling eventually became a diver for the Liverpool Salvage Company. Many of Tuke's models, like Phillip Harvey at Newlyn and Edwin 'Neddy' Hall in Falmouth, were local fishermen, mariners, or shipworkers.

© RIC

Featured Print

View of Gwinear Road station looking west, Cornwall. Possibly at the opening of the Helston branch line on 9th May 1887

'This photograph was probably taken on 9th May 1887, the opening day of the Helston branch line. Every part of the railway infrastructure in view is in almost perfect condition, having been newly installed for the creation of the new junction station. The stone work to the platforms and the locking room has obviously only recently been laid. Even the staff are well turned out. The main line retains the mixed gauge, albeit relaid with cross-sleepered track, whilst the branch line bay has been laid in narrow gauge only. The bay continues beyond the station, to a buffer stop built against the newly cut back end of the original cutting side. The branch line engine is in attendance, almost certainly a 517 class 0-4-2T, complete with polished brass dome. The contrasting painting schemes of the Signal & Telegraph department, responsible for the signal box next to the crossing, and that of the station buildings are clearly evident. In particular the signal box windows sashes are white, whereas those on the station are darker, probably brown. The signal box barge boards are relatively dark when compared with the wall boarding, whilst those on the station appear considerably lighter. The signals are the standard G.W.R. type which was to survive for many years, although at this period only single red spectacle plates were fitted, "all right" being indicated simply by the white light" Information from: The Broad Gauge In Cornwall. M. Jolly & P. Garnsworthy. Gwinear Road station with a locomotive on the Helston branch line with her crew and members of the station staff. Advertising on the station includes 'The Angel Hotel, Helston', 'W & A Gilbey' and 'Moon & Sons'

© From the collection of the RIC