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Images Dated 2018

Choose from 916 pictures in our Images Dated 2018 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


The Ringers of Launcells Tower, Frederick Smallfield (1829-1915) Featured 2018 Print

The Ringers of Launcells Tower, Frederick Smallfield (1829-1915)

Oil on canvas, English School, 1887. This painting was inspired by the poem The Ringers of Launcells Tower by Rev. R.S. Hawker of Morwenstow in his book Cornish Ballads and Other Poems'. In this poem, the bell ringers who rang at the accession of George III in 1760 were still alive to ring at his golden jubilee in 1810. The church of Launcells is midway between Stratton and Bude. The picture was painted 77 years after George III's golden jubilee and so is a total reconstruction. There is, therefore, no possibility that the figures are actual portraits of the 1810 ringers. Nevertheless, Smallfield had visited the church tower before he started the painting but made certain alterations to the layout for artistic reasons. He also studied the bell ringers at his local church in Willesden, north west London, to get the action and the angle of the ropes correct. A watercolour version of this painting was exhibited at the Watercolour Society in 1878. Frederick Smallfield studied at the Royal Academy and subsequently exhibited there several times. He lived for most of his life in London and at Lee-on-Solent in Hampshire

© RIC

Carving a printing block at Crysede Island Works, St Ives, Cornwall. Probably 1930s Featured 2018 Print

Carving a printing block at Crysede Island Works, St Ives, Cornwall. Probably 1930s

Keith Ross carving a printing block, watched by Tom Heron (right). Alec Walker left Mirfield, Yorkshire, in 1918 to set up a small experimental textile factory in Newlyn where wood-block printed silk fabrics and garments were designed and manufactured. By 1925 the Crysede venture had become a successful craft industry, employing many local people, which required larger premises. In 1926 the works moved to the former Western Pilchard cellar at the base of The Island in St Ives, where this photograph was taken. Photographer: Unknown

© From the collection of the RIC

The Lennox-Boyd brothers. Around 1915 Featured 2018 Print

The Lennox-Boyd brothers. Around 1915

Studio photograph of Alan Tindal Lennox-Boyd with his brothers. From left to right: George Edward Lennox-Boyd (1902-1943), Alan Tindal Lennox-Boyd (1904-1983), Donald Breay Hague Lennox-Boyd (1906-1939), Francis Gordon Lennox-Boyd (1909-1944). The boys are dressed in outfits resembling First World War British Army officer uniforms. Born on 18th November 1904, Alan was the son of Alan Walter Lennox-Boyd and Florence Annie Begbie. Educated at Sherborne School, Dorset, and Christ Church, Oxford, he married Lady Patricia Florence Susan Guinness on 29th December 1938 and died on 8th March 1983. He held the office of Member of Parliament (Conservative) for Mid-Bedfordshire between 1931 and 1960, holding the positions of Parliamentary Secretary to the Ministry of Labour in 1938, Parliamentary Secretary to the Ministry of Aircraft Production in 1943, Minister of State for Colonial Affairs 1951-1952, Minister for Transport and Civil Aviation, 1952-1954 and Secretary of State for Colonial Affairs, 1954-1959. He served as Lieutenant in the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve during the Second World War, was admitted to Inner Temple in 1941 and entitled to practise as a Barrister at Law. Appointed Privy Counsellor in 1951, he held the office of Deputy Lieutenant of Bedfordshire between 1954 and 1960, was managing director of Arthur Guinness & Sons between 1959 and 1967 and appointed Companion of Honour in 1960. He was created 1st Viscount Boyd of Merton in September 1960 and that same year, his wife, Patricia, Viscountess Boyd, purchased Ince Castle in St Stephens by Saltash, Cornwall. In 1965, Viscount Boyd held the office of Deputy Lieutenant of Cornwall. He died on 8th March 1983. The Boyd family lived at Ince Castle until 2018. George, a Major in the Highland Light Infantry, died in a military hospital in Scotland; Donald, a Captain in the Scots Guards, died in custody in Germany in events leading up to the Second World War; Francis, a Major in the Royal Scots Greys, was killed in action at Normandy, France, during the Second World War while leading 22nd Independent Parachute Company. Photographer: James Habgood, Boscombe

© From the collection of the RIC