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Home > Images Dated > 2018

Images Dated 2018

Choose from 915 pictures in our Images Dated 2018 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


The Ringers of Launcells Tower, Frederick Smallfield (1829-1915) Featured 2018 Image

The Ringers of Launcells Tower, Frederick Smallfield (1829-1915)

Oil on canvas, English School, 1887. This painting was inspired by the poem The Ringers of Launcells Tower by Rev. R.S. Hawker of Morwenstow in his book Cornish Ballads and Other Poems'. In this poem, the bell ringers who rang at the accession of George III in 1760 were still alive to ring at his golden jubilee in 1810. The church of Launcells is midway between Stratton and Bude. The picture was painted 77 years after George III's golden jubilee and so is a total reconstruction. There is, therefore, no possibility that the figures are actual portraits of the 1810 ringers. Nevertheless, Smallfield had visited the church tower before he started the painting but made certain alterations to the layout for artistic reasons. He also studied the bell ringers at his local church in Willesden, north west London, to get the action and the angle of the ropes correct. A watercolour version of this painting was exhibited at the Watercolour Society in 1878. Frederick Smallfield studied at the Royal Academy and subsequently exhibited there several times. He lived for most of his life in London and at Lee-on-Solent in Hampshire

© RIC

Maria Asumpta, Charlestown, Cornwall. August 1991 Featured 2018 Image

Maria Asumpta, Charlestown, Cornwall. August 1991

The tall ship Maria Asumpta enters Charlestown harbour. The oldest sailing ship in the world still sailing at that time, was invited to the port by the Charlestown Heritage and Trading Company. She spent two days in the port and acted as the venue for a sea shanty festival. The ship was launched at Badalona, Spain, in 1858 and was used to ship textiles between Argentina and Spain. Renamed Pepita in the 1930s, Cuidad de Inca in 1953, she was given back her original name in 1988. In 1995 the Maria Asumpta was on her first voyage after a refit in Gloucester when she hit bad weather and on the afternoon of 30th May prepared to enter Padstow harbour. The captain, Mark Litchfield, decided to sail between The Mouls and Pentire Point, not a route recommended by the Admiralty, she hit rocks and the crew abandoned ship with three men losing their lives. Mr Litchfield was charged with manslaughter due to gross negligence, was found guilty and jailed for 18 months. Photographer: Jonathan Barker

© RIC, photographer Jonathan Barker

Furzupland, Kenwyn, Cornwall. Early 1900s Featured 2018 Image

Furzupland, Kenwyn, Cornwall. Early 1900s

A young girl with a skipping rope is at the top of the steps, a lady holding a card or paper is on the right and a gentleman in a trilby is on the left. A gentleman with a white beard and wearing a cap can be seen looking out of a first floor window. The local story of this house is that it was built for an eccentric rich man. At the time when it was built, a well used thoroughfare ran beside the house and the man thought that someone might break in during the night and steal his money. So he had it built like a castle without stairs. At night he would climb up to the first floor using a rope ladder, pull the ladder up and sleep with a blunderbuss gun beside him. On the 1871 census an Edward George Spry, aged 36, lived there. He is described as a Bachelor of Arts, Landowner, Fund Holder and owner of stock in railways, mines etc. He was also part owner of the Red Lion Hotel in Boscawen Street, Truro. His housekeeper was Mary Verran. He and his housekeeper still lived there in 1881. Mr Spry died in 1887 leaving £11,000 (about £1 million today). The house is listed on the 1891 and 1901 censuses but with no occupants. Albert Sidney Labouchere-Sparling lived in the house between 1903 and 1906. In 1911, Josiah Clark (formerly of Tregavethan) lived there with his wife Olivia. It is possible that the people in the photograph are members of the Clark family. Furzuplands was home to the Brown family in the late 1950s. The property was later bought by architect Paul Bunyan and his wife, Laurence, who completely refurbished the interior. Photographer: Probably Arthur Philp

© From the collection of the RIC