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Images Dated 2018 July

Choose from 185 pictures in our Images Dated 2018 July collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured July Image

Tremough Lodge, Tremough Estate, Treliever Road, Penryn, Cornwall. Early 1900s

View showing the front entrance of Tremough Lodge on Treliever Road. There is a young girl walking near the entrance. The estate is named after the Tremough family who lived on the site from the 1300s to 1600s. Grade II listed, Tremough House was built in 1704 by John Worth, Sheriff of Cornwall. The house was also the private residence of several other families over the centuries, including John Tilly, Benjamin Sampson and William Shilson, as well as being home to the Tremough Academy for Young Gentlemen a short period. Tremough served as a convent for the Order of Les Filles de la Croix from 1943 to 1997. The estate was purchased in 1999 by the combined Universities in Cornwall group and was developed into the Penryn Campus for Falmouth University and the University of Exeter. The Lodge was added by Benjamin Sampson during the 19th century. Photographer: Probably Arthur William Jordan but possibly Arthur Philp.

© From the collection of the RIC

Featured July Image

Fore Street, Probus, Cornwall. Around 1913

The placard on the cottage reads "Cornwall County Police". The village Police Constable poses for the camera. The lady and the two children are probably the Policeman's wife and children. The same lady can be seen in photograph TRURI: PROct.5, in the distance looking from the roadway outside this cottage towards the camera. In that photograph her clothing and hairstyle, with a bow, are the same. Which would suggest that the photograph was taken on the same day. According to the 1911 Census of Probus, the Police constable was PC Mark Prust aged 28. Born about 1883. His wife was Maud Prust aged 26. At that time they did not have any children and they had been married for under two years. Their address was "Sunnyside, Probus." According to the 1901 Census of St Austell, Maud, nee Westcott, was aged 16 and living with her family in Blowing House Hill, St Austell. She was a dressmaker by trade. Under worker it stated "Own means." Further research using the book "One & All, A History of Policing in Cornwall, The Cornwall Constabulary 1857-1967" by Ken Searle, Published by Halsgrove in 2005, found that PC 6 Mark Prust was a carpenter from Hartland, Devon, prior to being appointed on 2nd November 1904 to the Cornwall Constabulary. On 19th May 1909, he married Maud Westcott at the Methodist Chapel, Tregonissey, St Austell. He had served at Bodmin, Falmouth and Truro from 1st May 1909. Probus village Police station was probably a satellite village station of Truro Police station. In the photograph Maud has two children. The child in the pushchair is about 12 months or under and the standing child is around 2 years old. This research information and Maud's style of clothing, including the height of her skirt hemline, would suggest that these two photographs (TRURI:PROct.5 and TRURI:PROct.6) were perhaps around taken around 1913. Photographer: Samuel John Govier.

© © RIC

Featured July Image

Lis Escop, Kenwyn, Cornwall. Around 1910

Lis Escop (Cornish for Bishop's Court) in winter with cattle in the foreground. Originally the Kenwyn Vicarage, in 1876 it became the residence of the Bishops of Truro. Around 1906, the Chapel and dining room, designed by E.H. Sedding and pictured in the centre of the house, were added by Bishop Stubbs. Therefore, the date of the photograph is around 1910 when these were completed. The bell turret was reportedly partially copied from the porch of St Mary's in Oxford. The house was stayed in by convalescing officers and Belgian refugees during the First World War. From 1953 until 1982 it was known as Copeland Court and was used by Truro Cathedral School as classrooms and a house for the headmaster. The house was named in memory of Geoffrey Copeland of Trelissick, a former pupil whose family gifted the funds necessary to purchase the property for the school. Copeland Court became a convent for the Community of the Epiphany in 1983. Renamed Epiphany House in 2001 the house became a conference and retreat centre. Photographer: Arthur William Jordan.

© From the collection of the RIC