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Images Dated 2019 February

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 37 pictures in our Images Dated 2019 February collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured February Print

Captain Tom Gundry, champion Cornish wrestler. Probably early 1880s

A studio portrait photograph of the champion Cornish wrestler, Thomas Gundry, wearing a wrestling jacket and two championship sashes. Gundry was born at Higher Prospidnick, Sithney, on 16th October 1818 and died at Stennack, Camborne, on 22nd October 1888. His obituary in the 'Mining Journal' of 27th October 1888 reads "Captain Tom Gundry is dead. This brief announcement will be read with regret by Cornishmen in every quarter of the world. 'Captain Tom' was the best known of the old school of Cornish wrestlers, and will be remembered for his prowess in the ring, and not as a mine agent. Born 70 years ago Captain Tom was bred in the parish of Sithney and from a child developed a strong passion for the favourite sport of the West Countryman. In the old days, wrestling was cultivated to a far higher degree than now; the leading gentlemen of the county, assisted by their patronage, presence, and financial support; and a match was the signal for an exodus of miners to witness the bouts. Captain Tom held the championship for a long period; he won many cups, and wrestled, not only in Cornwall and Devon; but in London also. It is said of him that whilst he unquestionably bought many 'backs', he never sold his own. He was at one time agent at Camborne Consols, and at another period agent at North Basset. Of late years he now and then assisted as stickler in the wrestling field. He expired at his home near Camborne, on Tuesday evening." He was married four times, the last at Treslothan, Camborne in May 1880. Photographer: John Charles Burrow

© From the collection of the RIC

Featured February Print

James Tangye (1825-1912) in his workshop at Aviary Court, Illogan, Cornwall. Around 1900

Mr James Tangye pictured in his workshop at his home, Aviary Court. He is seated, wearing a hat and holding a cane, amid various pieces of machinery. James was one of the five sons of Joseph Tangye senior, an Illogan miner, who commenced their engineering and manufacturing business together in Birmingham in 1856. James (1825-1912), the eldest, was very skilled with the lathe; Joseph (1826-1902) was the creative engineer; Richard (1833-1906) dealt with public relations and sales; George (1835-1920) was the businessman; while Edward (1832-1909), a Quaker, soon left to found his own business. Velocipedes, also known as 'Boneshakers', due to their iron 'tyres', were one of the many things that were manufactured at Tangye's Cornwall Works. The business also provided the hydraulic rams required to launch the Great Eastern, Brunel's ill-fated steel ship in 1857-1858, and to raise Cleopatra's Needle to its present position on the London Embankment in 1878. The first direct-acting steam pumps in Europe were made at the Cornwall Works in 1867 and the firm produced James Tangye's horizontal steam engines from 1869. By 1876 the firm employed 1300 workers. The Tangyes were also philanthropists and from 1880 were founders and major benefactors of the Birmingham Art Gallery and Museum and the Birmingham School of Art. Upon his retirement in 1872, "James returned to Illogan, where he purchased Aviary Cottage - a smallish house in a gentle green valley sheltered from the sea and the mines. There he established his own workshop in which he could follow the craft which he truly enjoyed. He spent much of his time giving a free training to young men of the neighbourhood who wished to prepare for engineering careers, but who, in the prevailing depression of the Cornish tin industry, had not the means to pay for apprenticeship. James also fitted up his own observatory with telescope and sidereal clock so that he could seriously pursue his hobby of astronomy. He made many journeys back to Smethwick to give help and advice whenever it was needed, but he never again felt tempted to leave for long his native village, where he died in 1912". (Rachel E. Waterhouse, 1957, A Hundred Years of Engineering Craftsmanship, Tangyes Limited 1857-1957). Photographer: Unknown

© From the collection of the RIC

Featured February Print

Scallop Fishermen, Fowey, Cornwall. January 1992

Fowey scallop fishermen, who were captured outside the Lugger Inn in a photograph in 1990, have been painted in oils. Sussex artist Pat Yendell saw the photo and was so impressed she decided to paint it. The result was loaned to the Lugger, and locals fundraised to buy a second painting which they commissioned from Pat, to be donated to the town. Fishermen, from left to right: Matthew Jane, Chris Curtis, Mike Dunn, Dave Thomas, Darren Vincent, Brendan Benson and Jason Powell, along with Spot the dog. Missing from this photograph is Mark Douglas, second from left in the painting. Photographer: Jonathan Barker

© RIC, photographer Jonathan Barker