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Mining Gallery

Choose from 114 pictures in our Mining collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


General surface view, Alfred mine, Perranzabuloe, Cornwall. Around 1910 Featured Mining Print

General surface view, Alfred mine, Perranzabuloe, Cornwall. Around 1910

General surface view of Alfred mine showing buildings, shed and miners. On the left, miners are building a chimney stack with scaffolding and ladder. On the right a triangle of timbers with winding gear and a pulley over a shaft. Glass plate marked Bolingey Mine. Around 1910. Photographer: Arthur Philp

© From the collection of the RIC

Group of Miners, Dolcoath Mine, Camborne, Cornwall. Probably early 1900s Featured Mining Print

Group of Miners, Dolcoath Mine, Camborne, Cornwall. Probably early 1900s

A group of miners at the surface. This photograph is probably taken somewhear near the dry or change house at Dolcoath, where the miners could wash and exchange their wet and dirty clothes for their surface clothes. It is taken prior to the men going underground, as they look clean and tidy, with some still wearing ordinary headgear. Also there are lots of candles in evidence that they will need underground. The older man on the right of the picture might be a Mine Captain. The earliest records of this mine show that it was being worked for copper in 1740, and probably earlier. It was nearly 300ft deep in 1746 and an extensive mine in 1778, when a section of its eastern part was published in Pryce's Mineralogis Cornubiensis. It closed ten years later, to reopen in 1799. In the next 120 years it became the largest and deepest mine in Cornwall, with its bottom level 3,000ft below the surface. Its output of copper and tin ores to 1788 is thought to have been no less than 1,2500,000, pounds, of which copper alone realised some 450,000 between 1740 and 1777. Between 1799 and 1920 its output amounted to over 9 million pounds, including income from sales of arsenic, silver and other minerals. The mine was in the dividend list for most of its working life, and shares, nicknamed Dollies, were the blue chip of the industry. Photographer: Unknown

© From the collection of the RIC

South Crofty Mine, Camborne, Cornwall. 28th February 1910 Featured Mining Print

South Crofty Mine, Camborne, Cornwall. 28th February 1910

One of John Charles Burrow's last underground photographs taken at the 170 fathoms level in Palmers section. It shows miners using a Stephens 3 1/4 inch drill fitted with a primitive sprayer. The water is obtained from the bucket. The drillers mate holds a hammer ready to strike the drill if it jams in the hole, a common fault with early machines with their inadequate rotating mechanism. Dry drilling by machine proved immensely damaging miners health, but spraying was not introduced into Cornwall, noted for its antiquated practices, until the early 1900s

© From the collection of the RIC