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Lostwithiel Gallery

Choose from 198 pictures in our Lostwithiel collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


Imperial Service Medal presentation to Bruce Netherton at Restormel Castle, Lanlivery Parish, Cornwall. June 1989 Featured Lostwithiel Image

Imperial Service Medal presentation to Bruce Netherton at Restormel Castle, Lanlivery Parish, Cornwall. June 1989

Bruce Netherton, centre, accompanied by his wife Florence, receives the Imperial Service Medal from Beric Morley, Regional Director English Heritage. Mr Netherton worked for 40 years at Restormel Castle, 30 of them in charge as custodian, and had already the Queen's Jubilee Medal. Bruce, who retired in 1986, remembers welcoming many visitors to the castle including Queen Elizabeth (later known as Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother) in 1950 when the entrance gates had to be taken down to allow her Rolls Royce to enter the grounds. Photographer: Jonathan Barker

© RIC, photographer Jonathan Barker

19th Century Barge, Lostwithiel, Cornwall. September 1992 Featured Lostwithiel Image

19th Century Barge, Lostwithiel, Cornwall. September 1992

River widening work on the River Fowey, just below Coulson Park at Lostwithiel, unearthed a 19th century barge buried in the river bank. Cornwall Council archaeologists, with Charlestown Heritage Shipwreck Society, brought diggers, note takers, measurers and photographers to the site. The barge was once used on the busy river to carry limestone for the kilns on Lostwithiel Quay, along with sand, seaweed and other cargoes. It was one of a fleet of four owned by the Liddicoat family. The barge was measured at 12 metres by 4 metres and was made of timber. Archaeologists worked on the boat for around a week before it was buried again to allow the contractors to finish the work on the river bank. Photographer: Jonathan Barker

© RIC, photographer Jonathan Barker

The Old Grammar School, Queen Street, Lostwithiel, Cornwall. 18th April 1965 Featured Lostwithiel Image

The Old Grammar School, Queen Street, Lostwithiel, Cornwall. 18th April 1965

The photograph shows the front elevation of the Grammar School in a dilapidated condition after years of neglect. Situated on Queen Street is a granite facade on which there is the Coat of Arms of Viscount Mount Edgcumbe and Valletort (Valletort being the title inherited on the death of a relative in Plymouth). This is the only remaining part of the Old Grammar School which was built by Lord Edgcumbe in 1781. The building was erected over the former Market Hall, with the upstairs intended for an Assembly Room and Concert Hall. However, became the Grammar Schoolroom instead. The Corporation paid twenty pounds per year, which enabled it to nominate six local boys to be educated free. The Grammar School closed in 1842, but schooling on the premises continued with a Writing or Commercial School until the end of the 19th century. It has had many uses since, including balls, concerts and meetings. Soup kitchens were run from the building in 1898-1899 and again during the Depression in the 1920s-1930s. Before the town had a cinema, silent movies were shown in the upstairs room and school children were taught the art of butter-making. The Sherwood Foresters were billeted there during the First World War and the Town Band later used the building for their practice room. The forecourt was used as a garage for repairs, car hire and petrol sales for over 20 years until the Second World War when it was used to billet US soldiers. After many years of neglect and disrepair, a redevelopment scheme provided sixteen flats for local senior citizens. This development retained the old facade and opened on 15th September 1981. Photographer: Charles Woolf

© RIC, photographer Charles Woolf