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Railways Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 80 pictures in our Railways collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


GWR (4-4-0) Bulldog SWIFT (3350) with men posed in front. Between 1900-1912 Featured Railways Print

GWR (4-4-0) Bulldog SWIFT (3350) with men posed in front. Between 1900-1912

Image shows GWR (4-4-0) Bulldog SWIFT (3350) possibly at Truro station although the locality is unknown. Eight workers are posed in front of the locomotive. This specific train was built in Swindon in March 1900. It was renumbered in 1912 to 3338 and then withdrawn and scrapped in November of 1933. It was one of 156 locomotives of its type. It was often used in Devon and Cornwall because their 5ft 8in driving wheels were useful on heavy gradients

© From the collection of the RIC

Portreath to Poldice Tramroad Featured Railways Print

Portreath to Poldice Tramroad

© From the collection of the RIC

Cornish, Heritage, Industrial, Industry, Mineral, Mining, Railway, Road, Tram, Tramway, Way

Locomotive 'Smelter' on the Redruth and Chacewater line, Cornwall. After 1854 Featured Railways Print

Locomotive 'Smelter' on the Redruth and Chacewater line, Cornwall. After 1854

Driver and fireman posing for the camera and a group of small children looking on from the vantage point of a high hedge in the background. Authorised by an Act of Parliament in 1824, the Redruth and Chacewater Railway opened on January 30th 1826, running from the Gwennap copper mines to the south coast port of Devoran, with a branch line to service the mines of Redruth. The 4ft gauge line carried minerals and goods only and generally worked profitably. It was worked by horses until 1854 when two tank locomotives, Miner and Smelter, were bought ? the first steam locomotives in Cornwall. Eventually during the 1860s the two competing lines were joined to form a coast to coast railway line. The line closed in 1915. Photographer: Unknown

© From the collection of the RIC