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Perranporth railway bridge. Late 1800s Featured Railways Print

Perranporth railway bridge. Late 1800s

A view from Nampara side of the railway bridge looking down Boscawen Road with Perranporth village and beach in the background. The building just in the picture on the left and behind the railway embankment is St Michael's Church. The three story building with the words hotel on the roof is the Tywarnhayle Hotel. The shop in the distance from the top of the bridge is displaying signs saying, Tea and hot water supplied. The area of land between the bridge and the shop would become Boscawen Gardens and boating lake. The large houses on the sky line, top left of picture, are on Tywarnhayle Road. Just off picture to the right of the bridge is the site of the future Perranporth Beach Halt which would be opened in 1931 to serve the tourist traffic and would become at times one of the busiest stations on the line, better situated for town and beach than the main Perranporth station

© From the collection of the RIC

View of St Ives with the railway station in foreground. Around 1880 Featured Railways Print

View of St Ives with the railway station in foreground. Around 1880

The St Ives branch was opened on 1st June 1877, by the GWR as successors to the West Cornwall Railway. The stonework of the railway buildings still appears very fresh in this view, which cannot have been taken much later. A slightly different view of a similar date appears in the G.W.R. Journal Special Cornish Issue 1992. The permanent way consisted of 76 Ib bullhead rail in 35 Ib cast iron chairs on cross sleepers, and unlike the mixed gauge main line, was broad gauge only. The viaduct to the right of the picture had three openings of 40 feet and seven of 20 feet, wrought iron girders being carried on masonry piers. The curved station building has a certain Brunelian feel about it, even though completed some 18 years after his death. A small signal box is provided to operate the typical G.W.R. semaphore signal. Two coaches stand in the station, another further along, and what appears to be a saloon at the far end. All are in two colour livery. Goods waggons in the picture consist of about seven opens and three vans, the limited goods traffic being reflected by the small yard of only two short sidings in addition to the two lines through the station. There was also a small engine shed just out of shot to the right. at this date the pilchard industry was at its height, and boats appear everywhere, on the beach, under the viaduct, in front of houses, on the slope behind, and next to the signal box. The image was certainly taken before 1888 as the wooden pier is still in good condition and the quay has not yet been lengthened. Photographer: Edward Ashton

© From the collection of the RIC

View of the Ponsanooth viaduct, Cornwall. Early 1900s Featured Railways Print

View of the Ponsanooth viaduct, Cornwall. Early 1900s

On the advice of the Victorian railway engineer, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, river crossings for the new Cornish railway line built by the Cornwall Railway Company (1859 to 1889) took the form of wooden viaducts, 42 in total, consisting of timber deck spans supported by fans of timber bracing built on masonry piers. This unusual method of construction substantially reduced the first cost of construction compared to an all-masonry structure, but at the cost of more expensive maintenance. The Ponsanooth viaduct crossed the River Kennall 2 miles north of Penryn. A Class B viaduct 139 feet (42 m) high and 645 feet (197 m) long on 9 piers. It was replaced by a new stone viaduct on 7 September 1930. This is the tallest viaduct west of Truro. In the foreground can be seen Wheal Maudlin (Magdalen) works (former Perran foundry boiler works). Photographer: Unknown

© From the collection of the RIC