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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
 

Buildings Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 337 pictures in our Buildings collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Print

Ince Castle, Elm Gate, St Stephens by Saltash, Cornwall. 1961

The main facade of Ince Castle, seen under scaffolding, during alteration work which included the addition of French windows to allow more light to the dark ground floor and extension of the service wing. The Grade I listed mansion house is thought to be the earliest brick house in Cornwall and overlooks the River Lynher, near Saltash. It was built by Henry Killigrew, Member of Parliament for West Looe, in the mid 17th century. The house was then bought by Truro merchant Edward Norsworthy in 1652. In 1722 the house was owned by John Hobart, 1st Earl of Buckinghamshire, before being sold to Pendock Neale, husband of Harriot Eliot of St Germans. In 1805, Ince was sold to Edward Smith. The house was inherited by his stepdaughter, Mary Smith, who lived there with her husband, Captain Henry Crease of the Royal Navy, and family until the 1850s. The house became rundown until it was bought and substantially remodelled by Montague Eliot (later to become 8th Earl of St Germans) in 1918. Between 1922 and 1937, Ince was owned by H.R. Somerset (known as Bobby), a well known yachtsman and founder member of the Royal Ocean Racing Club. His yacht, Jolie Brise, was the first winner of the Fastnet Race and was housed in the boathouse at Ince. Mr and Mrs James Bryce Allen owned the house between 1937 and 1960 when it was sold to Patricia, Viscountess Boyd, who was married to former Colonial Secretary Alan Lennox-Boyd, 1st Viscount Boyd of Merton. The gardens were created in the 1960s by Patricia, Lady Boyd, a keen plantswoman and vice-president of Cornwall Garden Society. Their son, Simon Lennox-Boyd, 2nd Viscount Boyd of Merton, and daughter in law, Alice, Lady Boyd, lived in the house between 1994 and 2018. Photographer: Charles Woolf .

© RIC, photographer Charles Woolf

Featured Print

Ruins in the East, Prosper Marilhat (1811-1847)

Oil on canvas, French School, 19th century. Oil on canvas, French School, 19th century. Born in Auvergne, central France in 1811, Prosper Marilhat was encouraged to paint from an early age, joining the studio of the French Romantic painter, Camille Roqueplan, in 1829. When he was twenty, after one of his paintings was shown at the Paris Salon of 1831, Marilhat was invited by the diplomat and botanist, Charles von Hugel, to join one of his expedition to the Middle East. As a result, Marilhat spent two years in Egypt, where he took numerous notes and sketches, building his reputation as an orientalist painter. Orientalism, is a term used to describe the 19th century romanticism of the East through painting, poetry and literature. The subject of this painting, Ruins in the East, is typical of the orientalist fantasy and nostalgia that often take the form of ruins. Marilhat's short career focussed on painting Islamic architecture, landscapes and portraits. In modern times, orientalism is seen more critically. In his book, Orientalism, published in 1978, the writer and critic Edward Said denounced orientalist expressions in Western art as demeaning and colonialist.

© RIC

Featured Print

Aftermath of fire at Tehidy, Illogan, Cornwall. February 1919

Side view of the house after the great fire of 26th February 1919. The fire is still smouldering and firefighters with the Redruth fire engine can be seen tackling the blaze, watched by many onlookers. The manor of Tehidy was owned by the Basset family who prospered from mining and their vast estate. The 40 bedroom mansion house seen in the photograph was built in 1855 to replace the earlier mansion of 1734. The manor was sold in 1916 ending 700 years of Basset rule. The house was acquired for the treatment of tuberculosis sufferers and handed over to Cornwall County Council on Whit Monday 20th May 1918. The fire devastated the building two weeks after the hospital opened and it was rebuilt by the County Council. Photographer: Arthur William Jordan.

© From the collection of the RIC