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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Grey Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 40 pictures in our Grey collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


The Boy Jacka, Henry Scott Tuke (1858-1929) Featured Print

The Boy Jacka, Henry Scott Tuke (1858-1929)

Oil on canvas, Newlyn School, 1886-1888. Full length portrait of boy against a green door. Henry Scott Tuke was born into a Quaker family in Lawrence Street, York. In 1859 the family moved to Falmouth, where his father Daniel Tuke , a physician, established a practice. Tuke was encouraged to draw and paint from an early age and some of his earliest drawings, aged four or five years old, were published in 1895. In 1875, he enrolled in the Slade School of Art. Initially his father paid for his tuition but in 1877 Tuke won a scholarship, which allowed him to continue his training at the Slade and in Italy in 1880. From 1881 to 1883 he was in Paris where he met the artist Jules Bastien-Lepage, who encouraged him to paint en plein air (in the open air) a method of working that came to dominate his practice. While studying in France, Tuke decided to move to Newlyn, Cornwall where many of his Slade and Parisian friends had already formed the Newlyn School of painters. He received several lucrative commissions there, after exhibiting his work at the Royal Academy of Art in London. In 1885, he returned to Falmouth where many of his major works were produced. He became an established artist and was elected to full membership of the Royal Academy in 1914. Tuke suffered a heart attack in 1928 and died in March 1929. In his will he left generous amounts of money to some of the men who, as boys, had been his models. Today he is remembered mainly for his oil paintings of young men, but in addition to his achievements as a figurative painter, he was an established maritime artist and produced as many portraits of sailing ships as he did human figures. He was a prolific artist, over 1,300 works are listed and more are still being discovered. Tuke painted over 13 portraits of 'quay scamp' and deckhand Jack 'Jacka' Rowing (Rolling) between 1886 and 1888. Rowling eventually became a diver for the Liverpool Salvage Company. Many of Tuke's models, like Phillip Harvey at Newlyn and Edwin 'Neddy' Hall in Falmouth, were local fishermen, mariners, or shipworkers.

© RIC

Still Life, Walter Langley (1852-1922) Featured Print

Still Life, Walter Langley (1852-1922)

Oil on board, Newlyn School, late 19th / early 20th century. Walter Langley was born in Birmingham, the eighth of eleven children of William Langley, a tailor, and his wife, Mary Ann. He was enrolled at the age of ten in evening classes at the Birmingham School of Design. He was apprenticed to lithographer, August Heinrich Biermann, and through lithography was introduced to the use of watercolour. Attracted to the medium, he set about learning to paint. He finally abandoned lithography to take up painting as a profession in 1879. In 1880, Langley visited Newlyn briefly and in the following year spent periods in both Brittany and Newlyn. He settled in Newlyn in 1882, one of the first artists to arrive there. His humble beginnings and his struggle for artistic recognition gave him a sympathetic insight into the hardships faced by the Newlyn community in its attempts to gain a livelihood from the sea. A study of a fisherman's widow, 'Time Moveth Not, Our Being 'Tis That Moves', submitted to the Dudley Gallery's Spring 1883 exhibition, caused a sensation and led to his membership of the Institute of Painters in Watercolour. Apart from a return to Birmingham in 1866-1867 and brief excursions to the continent, Langley remained for the rest of his life in Cornwall. He was honoured in 1886 by an exhibition of watercolours at the New Art Gallery in Birmingham and received international recognition through the award of a gold medal for watercolours at the Paris Exhibition of 1889. The fact that this still-life study (dedicated to his friend and fellow artist Ralph Todd) is painted in oils makes it an unusual addition to Langley's canon of work.

© © RIC

Chalcocite with Chalcopyrite, Tincroft Mine, Illogan, Cornwall, England Featured Print

Chalcocite with Chalcopyrite, Tincroft Mine, Illogan, Cornwall, England

Steel coloured crystals of chalcocite covering chalcopyrite. This botryoidal variety of chalcopyrite is known as blister copper. The specimen was drawn for Specimens of British Minerals, Selected from the Cabinet of Philip Rashleigh (1797, Volume 1, Plate 9, Figure 4) which states 'Is yellow mammillary copper ore, covered with a thin coat of a bluish-green colour, with crystals of steel-coloured copper ore, composed of prisms having six sides, and truncated ends, formed upon the mammillary copper ore. d One of the steel-coloured crystals magnified. From Tincroft'. Chalcocite is a secondary mineral occurring in or near the oxidised zone of copper sulfide deposits. Rashleigh Collection.

© RIC, photographer A.G. Tindle