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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Joyce Greenham Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 122 pictures in our Joyce Greenham collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Remains of pilchard cellars, Port Gaverne, St Endellion, Cornwall. 1973 Featured Print

Remains of pilchard cellars, Port Gaverne, St Endellion, Cornwall. 1973

Port Gaverne was once a busy port used to export slate from the nearby Delabole slate quarry. It was also a very active seining port and the pilchard cellars were capable of processing around 1000 tons of fish per week. Two of the four large pilchard cellars built in the early 1800s are now owned by the National Trust, these being the Rashleigh and Union cellars. National Trust signage can be seen to the left of the opening in the stone wall. Photographer: Charles Woolf .

© RIC, photographer Charles Woolf

Fore Street, Tregony, Cornwall. 1957 Featured Print

Fore Street, Tregony, Cornwall. 1957

Looking north eastward from the clock tower along Fore Street. On the left of the picture is the clock tower that was built in 1833. On the right hand side of the clock tower is Estelle ladies hairdresser. Further along the street, on the same side, is a petrol pump and sign reading Garage and Parking. The next building is the Kings Arms public house. Another shop can be seen on the left, just before the road bends to the left. Photographer: Charles Woolf .

© RIC, photographer Charles Woolf

Tregony Bridge, Tregony, Cornwall. 1975 Featured Print

Tregony Bridge, Tregony, Cornwall. 1975

A view looking up the River Fal with the Tregony Bridge in the left middle ground. On the right is Tregony Hill leading up to the centre of the village. Tregony was once considered a town and in the 14th century it was surrounded by busy woollen mills producing a rough serge aptly named 'Tregony Cloth'. A long time before that, the Phoenicians and Roman traders sailed here to trade tin. The river was navigable all the way to Tregony bridge, some fifteen miles from the sea, long before the ports of Truro, Penryn and Falmouth grew in importance. These days the river is silted up in part the result of run off due to deforestation and agriculture and also due to tin streaming and china clay processing upstream. Photographer: Charles Woolf .

© RIC, photographer Charles Woolf