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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004
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Mining Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 114 pictures in our Mining collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Kea
Kea
Perranzabuloe Featured Mining Print

Perranzabuloe

© From the collection of the RIC

Cornish, Mining

Dolcoath Mine, Camborne, Cornwall. 1893 Featured Mining Print

Dolcoath Mine, Camborne, Cornwall. 1893

The Man Engine at 234 fathoms level below adit, in 1893. The man engine went down to the 314 fathom level. Miners can be seen standing on the steps of the engine rod while others stand on solars or platforms fixed in the shaft at intervals of 12 feet. The man engine made 5 strokes a minute, thus enabling men to ride up or down 60 feet a minute. Ordinary ladders were fixed alongside the man engine or against the footwall of the lode. Photographer: John Charles Burrow

© From the collection of the RIC

Group of Miners, Dolcoath Mine, Camborne, Cornwall. Probably early 1900s Featured Mining Print

Group of Miners, Dolcoath Mine, Camborne, Cornwall. Probably early 1900s

A group of miners at the surface. This photograph is probably taken somewhear near the dry or change house at Dolcoath, where the miners could wash and exchange their wet and dirty clothes for their surface clothes. It is taken prior to the men going underground, as they look clean and tidy, with some still wearing ordinary headgear. Also there are lots of candles in evidence that they will need underground. The older man on the right of the picture might be a Mine Captain. The earliest records of this mine show that it was being worked for copper in 1740, and probably earlier. It was nearly 300ft deep in 1746 and an extensive mine in 1778, when a section of its eastern part was published in Pryce's Mineralogis Cornubiensis. It closed ten years later, to reopen in 1799. In the next 120 years it became the largest and deepest mine in Cornwall, with its bottom level 3,000ft below the surface. Its output of copper and tin ores to 1788 is thought to have been no less than 1,2500,000, pounds, of which copper alone realised some 450,000 between 1740 and 1777. Between 1799 and 1920 its output amounted to over 9 million pounds, including income from sales of arsenic, silver and other minerals. The mine was in the dividend list for most of its working life, and shares, nicknamed Dollies, were the blue chip of the industry. Photographer: Unknown

© From the collection of the RIC