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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

House Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 119 pictures in our House collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


House in the Trees at Hampstead, John Constable (1776-1837) Featured Print

House in the Trees at Hampstead, John Constable (1776-1837)

Oil on board, English School, 1821. John Constable was the son of wealthy miller in Bergholt, Suffolk. His family did not approve of his vocation as an artist but he joined the Royal Academy Schools as a student in 1799. From 1802 until around 1820 his paintings mostly featured the landscape of Suffolk, a number of which were made by sketching in oils, which had been popular among young English landscape artists since before 1800. Constable took this quick and direct method of painting and developed it into a tool of great range and refinement. The most famous example of work from this Suffolk-based phase is The Hay Wain (1821), which was in fact painted in the studio. Constable was elected to the Royal Academy in 1819 and from then onwards based himself in London and Hampstead. In 1829 he was made a full Academician and the last years of his life were spent consolidating his reputation as one of Britain's foremost landscape painters. House in the Trees at Hampstead is a study of trees made against the sky and it is one of several that the artist made shortly after he settled permanently in Hampstead with his family. It is unclear whether these sketches resulted in a finished work or whether he employed the tree and cloud studies in these sketches for a painting somewhere else

© RIC

Monday, Bryan Pearce (1929-2007) Featured Print

Monday, Bryan Pearce (1929-2007)

Oil on board, 1959. Bryan Pearce was born in St Ives in 1929 and suffered from the then unknown condition Phenylketonuria, which affects the normal development of the brain. Encouraged by his mother, the painter Mary Pearce, and then by other St Ives artists, he began drawing and painting in watercolours in 1953. His regular walks around St Ives, where he lived all his life, have been the inspiration for his subject matter, unconsciously recording the town's subtle changes. In this synthesis of imagination and reality, Pearce paints the world as he commands it; a sanctuary with an ever-present sun, bathing the streets and houses in the subtlest of colour harmonies. He worked slowly, but consistently, producing around twelve oil paintings a year. Often compared to Alfred Wallis, the late Peter Lanyon said of him: Because his sources are not seen with a passive eye, but are truly happenings, his painting is original'. His particular experiences of his hometown were captured with unique clarity. Pearce's artistic developments, his simple renditions of space, colour and light, evolve from a sophisticated understanding of composition. He had a career which spanned over fifty years, his paintings seem to evoke a serene sense of place, which seems at once personal yet archetypal. He is now recognised as one of the country's foremost naive painters, through the re-examination of familiar views and landmarks, Pearce offers us his profound, extraordinary experience of St Ives

© RIC

Duke of Cornwall views archaeology collections during a visit to the Royal Cornwall Museum to mark the bicentenary year of the Royal Institution of Cornwall, River Street, Truro, Cornwall. 22nd March 2018 Featured Print

Duke of Cornwall views archaeology collections during a visit to the Royal Cornwall Museum to mark the bicentenary year of the Royal Institution of Cornwall, River Street, Truro, Cornwall. 22nd March 2018

The Principle Archaeologist of Cornwall Archaeological Unit talks to the Duke of Cornwall about some Cornish archaeological artefacts. Standing to the left are the Chairman of the Royal Institution of Cornwall and Director of the Royal Cornwall Museum. Standing by the table, on the right, are two museum volunteers and the Portable Antiquities Scheme Finds Liaison Officer for Cornwall. The Royal Cornwall Museum is the main repository for archaeological archives in Cornwall. One of a series of images documenting the visit of the Royal Institution of Cornwall's patron, His Royal Highness Prince of Wales, Duke of Cornwall, to the Royal Cornwall Museum and Courtney Library on 22nd March 2018. The visit by Prince Charles marked the bicentenary year of the Royal Institution of Cornwall. Photographer: Sophie Meyer / Nicki Foley

© RIC