Skip to main content
[email protected]
Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Transport Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 136 pictures in our Transport collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Joseph Tangye (1826-1902) on a velocipede, probably Wolverhampton, West Midlands. Around 1870 Featured Print

Joseph Tangye (1826-1902) on a velocipede, probably Wolverhampton, West Midlands. Around 1870

The velocipede in the photograph is very similar to the one in the collection of the Royal Cornwall Museum (TRURI : 1937.34). Tangye's Cornwall Works in Birmingham built large numbers of velocipedes, paying a royalty to the French Velocipede Company in order to make the bicycles. The five sons of Joseph Tangye senior, an Illogan miner, commenced their engineering and manufacturing business together in Birmingham in 1856. James (1825-1912), the eldest, was very skilled with the lathe; Joseph (1826-1902) was the creative engineer; Richard (1833-1906) dealt with public relations and sales; George (1835-1920) was the businessman; while Edward (1832-1909), a Quaker, soon left to found his own business. Velocipedes, also known as ‘Boneshakers', due to their iron ‘tyres', were one of the many things that were manufactured at the Cornwall Works. The business also provided the hydraulic rams required to launch the Great Eastern, Brunel's ill-fated steel ship in 1857-1858, and to raise Cleopatra's Needle to its present position on the London Embankment in 1878. The first direct-acting steam pumps in Europe were made at the Cornwall Works in 1867 and the firm produced James Tangye's horizontal steam engines from 1869. By 1876 the firm employed 1300 workers. The Tangyes were also philanthropists and from 1880 were founders and major benefactors of the Birmingham Art Gallery and Museum and the Birmingham School of Art. Photographer: Edward Hill, 39, Darlington Street, Wolverhampton.

© From the collection of the RIC

James Tangye (1825-1912) in his workshop at Aviary Court, Illogan, Cornwall. Around 1900 Featured Print

James Tangye (1825-1912) in his workshop at Aviary Court, Illogan, Cornwall. Around 1900

Mr James Tangye pictured in his workshop at his home, Aviary Court. He is seated, wearing a hat and holding a cane, amid various pieces of machinery. James was one of the five sons of Joseph Tangye senior, an Illogan miner, who commenced their engineering and manufacturing business together in Birmingham in 1856. James (1825-1912), the eldest, was very skilled with the lathe; Joseph (1826-1902) was the creative engineer; Richard (1833-1906) dealt with public relations and sales; George (1835-1920) was the businessman; while Edward (1832-1909), a Quaker, soon left to found his own business. Velocipedes, also known as 'Boneshakers', due to their iron 'tyres', were one of the many things that were manufactured at Tangye's Cornwall Works. The business also provided the hydraulic rams required to launch the Great Eastern, Brunel's ill-fated steel ship in 1857-1858, and to raise Cleopatra's Needle to its present position on the London Embankment in 1878. The first direct-acting steam pumps in Europe were made at the Cornwall Works in 1867 and the firm produced James Tangye's horizontal steam engines from 1869. By 1876 the firm employed 1300 workers. The Tangyes were also philanthropists and from 1880 were founders and major benefactors of the Birmingham Art Gallery and Museum and the Birmingham School of Art. Upon his retirement in 1872, "James returned to Illogan, where he purchased Aviary Cottage - a smallish house in a gentle green valley sheltered from the sea and the mines. There he established his own workshop in which he could follow the craft which he truly enjoyed. He spent much of his time giving a free training to young men of the neighbourhood who wished to prepare for engineering careers, but who, in the prevailing depression of the Cornish tin industry, had not the means to pay for apprenticeship. James also fitted up his own observatory with telescope and sidereal clock so that he could seriously pursue his hobby of astronomy. He made many journeys back to Smethwick to give help and advice whenever it was needed, but he never again felt tempted to leave for long his native village, where he died in 1912". (Rachel E. Waterhouse, 1957, A Hundred Years of Engineering Craftsmanship, Tangyes Limited 1857-1957). Photographer: Unknown.

© From the collection of the RIC

Royal Albert Bridge under construction, Saltash, Cornwall. 1858 Featured Print

Royal Albert Bridge under construction, Saltash, Cornwall. 1858

View of the construction of the Royal Albert Bridge from the St Budeaux side of the Tamar river. The first span was in place and the second span was floated out on to the river on 10th July 1858. The image shows it being jacked into position as the piers are built up. The bridge was officially opened by Prince Albert on the 2nd May 1859. Isambard Kingdom Brunel's bridge consists of two 450ft arched tubular spans which meet in mid river on four cast iron columns secured to a central underwater pier. The spans were high enough to give the Royal Navy's tall ships clear heading.

© From the collection of the RIC