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Images Dated 2019 January

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 128 pictures in our Images Dated 2019 January collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured January Print

Copper Alloy Pre-decimal One Penny (1d) Coin, England

The obverse bears the youthful portrait of Queen Elizabeth II (reigned 1952-) wearing a laurel wreath in her hair. The inscription ELIZABETH II DEI GRATIA REGINA F : D: + encircles the portrait. This portrait by artist Mary Gillick (1881-1965) was used on British coins until 1968 when new 5 pence and 10 pence coins were introduced, ahead of decimalisation in 1971. Royal portraits have been used on English coins for over 1000 years. The reverse features a seated Britannia holding Neptune's trident and shield, with the sea behind and a lighthouse on the left. The inscription ONE PENNY are placed on either side with the year, 1967, towards the bottom. Britannia, the female steadfast and ready warrior who is an emblem of Britain, first appeared on coins back in the Roman era. Charles II reintroduced Britannia onto British coins in 1672 and she remains on some of our coins to this day

© RIC, photographer Mike Searle

Featured January Print

Queen Victoria Jubilee Head Silver Crown, England

The obverse of the silver crown features Queen Victoria's Jubilee portrait, facing left and wearing the small diamond crown, commissioned by her in 1870. VICTORIA D : G : BRITT : REG : F : D appear either side of the portrait with the engraver's initials J.E.B. (Joseph Edgar Boehm, 1834-1890) on the queen's shoulder. The reverse pictures Benedetto Pistrucci's St George on horseback, slaying the dragon, together with the initials B.P. and the year 1890. The jubilee head design was used from 1887, for silver and gold coins only, and was continued until 1893. It was introduced for the golden jubilee (50 years) of Queen Victoria's reign. Royal portraits have been used on English coins for over 1000 years. The British Crown came into circulation in 1707, after the Union of England and Scotland, to replace the English Crown and Scottish Dollar. The value was set at 5 shillings. It measures 38 mm in diameter and weighs around 28 grams

© RIC, photographer Mike Searle

Featured January Print

Pottery Bottle, Peru, South America

This bottle is likely to have been made by the Chim? people, who lived in northern Peru. It dates from AD1100-1300 and depicts a human-like figure holding a monkey. Much Chim?an pottery incorporates representations of human-like characters and animals, usually monkeys or seabirds, into their design. The geometric patterns on the pot are thought to represent waves, representing the culture's relationship with the sea and maritime excursions. The consistency of the shapes and decorations are often achieved via the mass production technique of 'press moulding'. The Chim? are best known for making black pottery, which is thought to have been accomplished by reducing oxygen levels during the clay firing process. Before firing the clay, they would often burnish the vessel in order to give it a unique silver sheen; it is because of this that Chim?an pottery was very rarely painted. The majority of Peruvian pottery is black in colour, characterised by a distinctive metallic look. The bottle is 21.0 cm high and 15.0 cm wide. TRURI : 1927.49

© RIC, photographer Mike Searle